Fonds BEH - Julian Behrstock Papers

Identity area

Reference code

FR PUNES AG 14-BEH

Title

Julian Behrstock Papers

Date(s)

  • 1948 - 1976 (Creation)

Level of description

Fonds

Extent and medium

1 box

Context area

Name of creator

(1917-1997)

Biographical history

Julian Behrstock was a UNESCO staff member for 28 years until his retirement in 1976. He entered the Department of mass information in 1948 as responsible for the World Programme for Book development. He served as director of the Division of Free Flow of Information and the promotion of books and readership from 1967 to 1976.
Before arriving at UNESCO, Behrstock graduated from Northwestern University and worked as a newspaperman in Paris and later in U.S. Government service in London and Paris. In 1977, upon retirement from UNESCO, he won the International Book Award "for outstanding services to the cause of books".

Repository

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Scope and content

Personal files concerning three aspects of UNESCO's programme: Free Flow of Information, Mass Media and Book Development.

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Language of material

  • English

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